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The BrauBeviale draws ever nearer…

07 November 2019

The BrauBeviale draws ever nearer…

There’s no doubt about it. Your first impression was correct. The weighty October issue of BRAUWELT International is a good indication that the BrauBeviale, one of the trade fair highlights of the year in Germany, will soon be upon us. In this issue, we have much for you to marvel at, as you no doubt already know, having seen our BrauBeviale Preview. You will also find something new, much worth knowing and even some surprises...

Craft Lager – The famous Munich Oktoberfest has recently come to an end. Can the “Festbier” served there be considered craft beer? Regardless, it is certainly an excellent example of the fine art of brewing according to the Reinheitsgebot. Perhaps some US craft brewers also perceive it that way: Horst Dornbusch reports on the latest trend in the American craft beer market: lager beer. The once somewhat frowned upon bottom-fermented beers brewed in the Czech and German tradition are now exhibiting huge growth potential in the US (p. 300).

Professional tasting – Almost 300 jurors from 33 countries dedicated themselves to sampling a wide range of beers from all over the globe at the World Beer Cup competition in 2018. Those who have already taken part in a professional beer tasting know how much knowledge and concentration are required to judge the beers, not mention the talent necessary for organizing this type of event. Our authors have taken an in-depth look into the topic of sensory analysis and describe how panel validation and data analysis can be optimized in the second part of their article on p. 356.

Lauter and faster – Lautering is often seen as the bottleneck of the brewing process. Peter Bandelt of TU Munich-Weihenstephan has therefore worked to increase the rate of this brewhouse process. He has conducted trials with flocculating agents, in order to bring about the aggregation and a more favorable distribution of the fine particles in the grain bed. Whether he was able to accelerate the flow rate and what other effects were observed, is disclosed on p. 336.

Challenging and practical – Those who have completed a degree at Weihenstephan have had a rather hard slog. Though the studies are challenging, they are also very practically oriented. The Mollier diagram, as our author and experienced maltster Karl Weigt describes on p. 324, represents a tool that can be utilized to optimize the malting process. Drawing on typical examples from his own experience, he demonstrates how understanding the Mollier diagram can keep maltsters from making mistakes and save money in the process.

It’s really not all that difficult...